The Babbel Blog

Online Language Learning

Happy European Day of Languages!

Posted on September 26, 2013 by

Read this post in German (Deutsch)

Today is the 12th European Day of Languages. The action goes back to an initiative of the Council of Europe and celebrates the 24 official languages ​​and over 60 language communities existing in the European Union.

That English is the most widely spoken foreign language in the EU, is no longer a secret. What other mother tongues ​​and foreign languages ​​are predominantly spoken in the EU, and what benefits they entail, is shown here. Feel free to share the love, just link back to the original post!

 

 

 

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

So fresh! The new iPhone apps are here – with the complete range of courses!

Posted on September 24, 2013 by

Read this post in German (Deutsch), French (Français), Spanish (Español), Italian (Italiano)

Start screen for German learners

Start screen for English learners

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For months our developers, designers and language teachers have toiled, heatedly debated and worked long coffee and Club Mate-fuelled nights. And now the fruits of their labor are here to coincide with the release of iOS 7: the new Babbel apps!

The Babbel “D-Team”

For the first time the new apps offer all of the popular premium features of the web version on the iPhone and iPod Touch, such as interactive dialogs, grammar, vocabulary, listening and writing exercises as well as improved speech recognition. Furthermore, we have given the mobile user interface a complete makeover: it now has a clean and modern look, is easy to use and offers even more learning fun and motivation with short animations and sound effects.

How does cross-platform learning work?

All courses in your pocket!

The mobile apps offer almost everything that the online program does (brand new courses, business

English and the intermediate-level B1 course are currently exclusively available on babbel.com) and are included with the regular subscription as standard. That means users can log in to all of the platforms using one login and learn with no extra costs. The new app is valid for all mobile devices. Once loaded and installed, a user’s learning progress is automatically synchronized between their iPhone, iPod Touch and the web.

Babbel is moving language learning out of the living room and out into the street, the park, the train, the cafe, when and wherever it suits. Users can study what they want and for as long as they wish. A few new pieces of vocabulary while waiting in line for the supermarket checkout or a grammar lesson when commuting to work. “Many people want to learn a new language but don’t have the time or the motivation,” says our CEO, Markus Witte. “The new app can help with that because it is always available and can be accessed anywhere. I am extremely proud of my team and the result of all the hard work!”

Check out the Spanish App!
Check out the French App!

New apps – soon for Android too

The apps for our three most popular languages, English, Spanish and French, are already available for free download. More languages will follow soon. As always with Babbel, the first lesson of each course is free to try. A subscription includes complete access to all of the content. Subscriptions are no longer set up via babbel.com but directly through the app. A one-month subscription can be purchased for 9.99 euro, a three-month subscription for 19.99 euro and a 6-month subscription for 33.99 euro. The free vocabulary trainer apps for the iPhone will continue to be provided as an extra until further notice.

And for all Android users: soon there will be apps for you too!

click here to go to the App Store

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Guess what’s on the way?

Posted on September 20, 2013 by

.. More next tuesday. Stay tuned..

 

 

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

O’zapft is! – The course for Oktoberfest

Posted on September 6, 2013 by

Read this post in German (Deutsch), Spanish (Español)Italian (Italiano)

If you ask what the Germans are famous for when you are in another country then the chances are that lederhosen, dirndls, beer and the humble Bretzel, or ‘pretzel’ as they are known in the English-speaking world, will be pretty high up the list. The Oktoberfest itself has also made a name for itself as the largest folk festival in the world and is a magnet for visitors from all over. There are enough reasons, then, to make the trip there yourself and to form your own opinions about the colourful happenings ‘on the Wiesn’.

Oktoberfest has a lot more to offer than just beer tents and prezel-chewing visitors in dirndls and lederhosen. Did you know, for example, that there are historical wooden fairground rides dating from the 19th century that are accompanied by their own live brass bands? In the 1930s the Krinoline carrousel was still hand-driven by four powerful men because that was the only way the particular rotary motion could be generated at the time.

In fact, some of the time-honoured traditions turn out to be much younger upon closer inspection. At the start of the 19th century traditional Bavarian costume was not worn at the Oktoberfest at all, rather French fashion…

There is so much to discover. With our Oktoberfest course, beginners can prepare themselves linguistically and of course arm themselves to order beer from a true Bavarian waitress. The short dialogues and information cards are also peppered with cultural and historical facts. In the last of six lessons, courageous learners can try their hand at the Bavarian dialect because this is what every new arrival will encounter sooner or later at the Oktoberfest. So then. O’zapft is! Des wird a Mordsgaudi!

Frauke and Maren are project managers at Babbel and have designed and written numerous German courses together. For the Oktoberfest course they went on a journey of research into the linguistic, historical and gastronomic depths of the so-called Wiesn.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone