The Babbel Blog

language learning in the digital age

Refugees from the Congo give themselves a voice with Babbel

Posted on February 11, 2014 by

crisiAbout the blogger: Crisi is an old hand at Babbel and has been on board since 2008. It’s not only professionally that she loves to meet people and to learn with them: She has already travelled to 47 countries and in addition to souvenirs she also always brings home a smattering of local language with her. This is how to greet someone in Luganda, the other official language in Uganda alongside English: “Ki kati!”.

 

Whether you live in a rich country or a poor one, in a tiny village or amidst the bustle of a mega-city: It doesn’t take much to open up new perspectives for yourself – for example access to the Internet and a will to learn.
I had this experience once again last year in Uganda. In February, I travelled to Uganda for a month and met with Edmund Page from the Xavier Project in the capital, Kampala. This initiative and its sister project YARID (Young African Refugees for Integral Development) have made it their mission to provide access to education for the numerous refugees in the city.

Most refugees trying to build a new existence for themselves in peaceful Uganda come from the neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo, which has seen bloody conflicts flare up repeatedly over the past twenty years. So far, over five million people have been killed in the war for gold, diamonds and mineral resources and an estimated one to two million are currently displaced, of whom alone about 50,000 are living in Kampala. They lack everything, including accommodation, food and medical care. Even if they were expelled by the rebels as students, traders, mothers, nurses or teachers, they are not welcomed in Uganda with open arms as refugees speaking a different language. They can communicate very little, except with other people in the same circumstances, because in the Congo, alongside the local languages mostly French is spoken. In Uganda, however, it is mainly English that is spoken. So if you want to find work in Kampala and take part in public life, you need good English skills!Bildschirmfoto 2014-02-03 um 15.30.21

At YARID some of the refugees have the possibility to take part in an English course for free. Often it takes a lot of effort for them to be able to concentrate on learning, since beginner and advanced pupils are taught together, often about 70 people all at the same time in a small room. One of the volunteers is Robert, who fled the Congo in 2008 and now passes on the language skills he obtained to those that have followed him.

 

For an hour I helped Robert to teach the mostly adult students. It was really fun, because they were extremely enthusiastic! Although the teaching time was short, I was quite worn out because I was having to fight against the noise levels in the small corrugated iron hut. I also found it a real shame not to be able to address the individual course participants on their various learning levels – some were visibly bored, while others had a hard time to keep up with the lesson, in which mostly whole sentences were written up on the blackboard and repeated loudly in chorus. Especially the women on the course are very shy and don’t dare to come forward and to ask questions if they don’t understand something.

After my host Edmund showed me the computer room of the Xavier Project, I came up with the idea of using Babbel – English courses on the computer would solve all these problems!Bildschirmfoto 2014-02-03 um 15.32.06

At first, however, it was only a half success: Out of the twelve outdated machines only two worked well enough and the Internet connection was painfully slow. I put my own laptop alongside them and always put two or three people on one computer. Most of them had never used a computer before and first of all needed to familiarise themselves with how you click with the mouse or which letter is to be found where on the keyboard. But once they arrived on the Babbel website, everything worked wonderfully: Lesson after lesson vocabulary was spoken out loud and typed in – long into the evening, until the room had to be closed.

girlsIn the days that followed I repeatedly held a “Ladies’ Day” and explicitly invited women from the English class in the afternoon to the computer room, including Fatou, who, at 60, is one of the older students. They didn’t let their initial Bildschirmfoto 2014-02-03 um 16.53.55struggles with the keyboard discourage them, and before long were posting requests on their Facebook accounts to all “moms” to do likewise and learn English in this way. To see how much fun Fatou and the other women had on the computer has motivated me to become an advocate for reliable access for refugees to Babbel courses.

new laptop
Back in Berlin I launched a fundraising campaign within Babbel and my circle of friends, which was very successful. So, in November, I was able to return to Uganda with some laptops, speakers, and some money for a better Internet connection. This time I showed Alex, the new employee of the Xavier Project, how to set up Babbel accounts, redeem donated access codes and select courses that match one’s own ability level. From this month on, Alex will be conducting regular computer courses, where he shows his participants, amongst other things, how to use Babbel.
So the refugees in the project will be able to learn English with their own account, whenever they have time, and at the same time practise using a computer, which will give them an advantage when looking for a job. In so doing, each person can take the time that he or she needs to learn spoken and written English according to their own ability.

I am very pleased that the Congolese refugees in Kampala have a way to improve their situation with relatively little effort and I hope that many of them will soon become a part of Ugandan society. Often it only takes a small initiative, to produce something that makes the world much bigger. Or, as they say in Uganda in their down-to-earth way: “The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The next best time is now.”

Comments

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Remarkable issues here. I am very satisfied to look your article.
Thank you a lot and I’m having a look forward to touch you.
Will you kindly drop me a e-mail?

Muito legal, a atitude dessa moça. para a ajudar o próximo parabéns, show show de bola ai que agente ve que tem pessoas boas neste mundo tão sombrio. e cheio de maldade, então a gente ve uma mulher com o coração muito bom com o próximo. é realmente muito lindo, somos todos filho de Deus e é isso mesmo temos mais é que ajudar o próximo. pois nada neste mundo levaremos. fique muito feliz em ve estas imagem de pessoas de outro pais sorrindo com aqueles computadores na mão.
fiquei feliz mesmo. mesmo não entendendo a inglês mais. estou me esforçando para a aprender esta língua que acho muito importante para mim.

I think that mini histories are very very helpfull to learning languages.

Parabéns pelo bom trabalho!
Crisi pessoas como vc faz a diferencia.Obrigado.

Very good job and importante to show how live, the situation of the refugees from the CONGO.

Thanks for the good work, Cris! I’m especially pleased to hear about your valuable contribution to YARID because I know Robert (he’s one of the YARID founders) and Edmund, and I’m familiar with their work on the ground. Asante sana! (Thank you, in Swahili)

Excellent the initiative of the Babbel for to help the refugees from the Congo. Congratulations.

Thank you for your efforts for the refugees.
I shared this good news on facebook.

Je parle Francais je voudrai apprendre a parler et ecrire en Anglais

cause, you´re amazing. strong.strong

Great for Crisi !!! .. really should
be many people like this good person who could help those people…I´ll pay for her.

The bright iniciation for congoles brother save an Kampala; very, very good
God the Paz save!!!

Wow, great job, Crisi! :)

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