The Babbel Blog

language learning in the digital age

Portrait: Richard Janssen’s Turkish Challenge

Posted on July 8, 2016 by

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Not long ago, we met Richard Janssen, a hyperpolyglot and food fanatic from Venlo in the Netherlands. Having marveled at the extent of his linguistic abilities, we decided to push them to their limits with a test: a one-month, Babbel-only Turkish challenge. Here’s how it went down.

 

Need a recap? Check out our previous article on Richard before reading on – I promise you’ll be impressed.

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User Portrait: Introducing Richard Janssen

Posted on May 9, 2016 by

Ricci-mrt

 

Richard Janssen knows a thing or two about languages. Like our very own Matthew Youlden, he’s what we call a hyperpolyglot. Upon hearing the extent of Richard’s linguistic abilities, Sam Taylor decided to put those skills to the test (with a little help from Babbel, of course).

 

Here’s part one of two — in which we meet Richard and find out what makes him tick.

 

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My name is “Cloud”. Who are you? Turkish names and their meanings

Posted on March 24, 2015 by

turkish names

My name is Fideniz Ercan. I’m the Turkish language project manager at Babbel. As my name suggests, my parents are from Turkey. And you’re about to learn what Turkish names give away besides just origin.

Turkish names are found in all aspects of life. These are often everyday words such as love (Sevgi), wish (Dilek), luck (Uğur), hope (Ümit) and free (Özgür). This is an especially big plus for those learning Turkish. Because when they discover the meaning of a name, they can immediately add another word to their vocabulary.

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Tongue-twister challenge!

Posted on October 1, 2014 by

tongue-twister

When you’re learning a new language, tongue-twisters are a great way to practice your pronunciation. Tongue-twisters are sentences or series of words that are hard to say. They often have similar alternating sounds, like ‘s’ and ‘sh’ or ‘p’ and ‘b’. Although they are typically nonsense, the English classic “She sells sea shells on the sea shore, and the shells that she sells are sea shells, I’m sure” was actually a popular song in 1908 based on the life of Mary Anning, a famous British fossil hunter and collector.

To celebrate the release of our Swedish tongue-twisters course, we’ve selected eight tongue-twisters in different languages – English, German, Italian, French, Danish, Swedish, Turkish and Russian – and turned them into short animations. Can you master them? (more…)

Turkish delights

Posted on May 9, 2014 by

Turkish Delights

Turkish delight’ by Dewet / CC 2.0

Babbel’s Turkish Delights course, full of useful phrases and everyday expressions, is out now.

You are in a shop in Istanbul. You thank the shopkeeper for giving you such a great discount on that rug you really can’t afford, and say goodbye.

“Laughing, laughing,” he replies.

Turkish is filled with these kind of small idiosyncrasies. If people want to thank you for your physical labour, they say ‘health to your hands’. The correct response to someone who sneezes is ‘live long,’ and the reply roughly translates as ‘you see it too’ (i.e. I hope that you live long enough to see my long life).

Babbel’s new course, Typical phrases and useful expressions, is available for both German and English users.

It’s perfect for those who already know a little Turkish, and want to learn the little phrases and expressions that are so helpful in everyday life – whether you’re in Istanbul or Berlin.

Off into the Turkish sign-jungle!

Posted on May 29, 2013 by

Read this post in German (Deutsch)

In the middle of the multicultural Berlin neighborhood of Kreuzberg, you will find Germany’s largest Turkish community – and our Babbel offices! What for die-hard, born n’ bred Berliners is an everyday part of the landscape, often makes visitors do a double-take: Many shops and businesses around here not only publicize their wares with German signs, but also Turkish ones.

 Sure, most people already know what “döner” and “ayran” are, but what kind of meat or vegetable arrives on your plate when you order “sığır” or “patlıcan”? Like me, many of you might also be wondering why sometimes the door to the supermarket won’t open even though it seems like there are people inside…? Had I known that the sign “çıkış” meant “exit”, I of course would have been trying to push through the “giriş” (“entrance”) instead!

 With this in mind, among the course editors we had the idea to do a little course where we introduce some basic signs that you might see in Turkey – but also in the German capital. Armed with bicycles and cameras, we combed the Berlin streets, photographing everything that passed in front of our lens. And we discovered that if you keep your eyes peeled, all sorts of signs and sayings start to come out of the woodwork. Besides the dentist’s office “dişçi” (dentist) the book shop is called “kitapçı”. The driving school is branded with “sürücü kursu” (driving courses) and the “baklavacı” (Baklava-bakery) offers Turkish sweets.

 Some words that you come across in the sign-jungle sound a lot like the German – or the English, for that matter: “taksi” (taxi), “kurs” (course), “büro” (office/bureau) and “yoğurt” (yogurt), for example. You can find these so-called internationalisms in many languages; they sound alike and mean the same thing. That means you can often understand more than you think!

 So that the course would be more than just showing the signs and their translations, we studded it with grammar explanations and pronunciation tips, too. So when in doubt, you can ask where the “tuvalet” (toilet) is with the proper emphasis – and say thank you with a “teşekkürler” afterwards!

Four New Languages!

Posted on June 15, 2011 by

New languages: Indonesian, Polish, Dutch and Turkish

 

 

 

 

 

Babbel is adding four new languages to the roster: Polish, Dutch, Turkish and Indonesian. That makes eleven languages in total! With these new additions Babbel is offering learners the chance to engage with cultures that welcome a lot of travelers, but don’t often have a lot of foreign students of their languages.

Studying the local tongue is a great way to get a perspective on the place you’re visiting. It also makes getting around a lot easier!

Babbel’s four new languages are also astonishingly widely spoken outside the places you might immediately assume. On a visit to Chicago or London, Polish could come in quite handy, as would Turkish in Germany. Chicago is one of the largest cities of the Polish Diaspora, and it’s been said that Berlin is one of the biggest Turkish cities outside of Turkey.

As for Indonesian, the language is very closely related to Bahasa Malaysia, the language spoken in Malaysia, and both Belgium and Suriname count Dutch as one of their official languages.

The kick-off packages contain vocabulary and phrases and also incorporate popular Babbel features such as the automatic Review Manager and the Pronunciation Trainer with real-time speech recognition (all the better to get your tongue around those Polish sibilant sounds or those umlauts in Turkish). As usual at Babbel, new content is permanently in the works and new learning material will follow soon.

With a three-month subscription, access to all content within the Turkish, Polish, Dutch and Indonesian courses is available at a special rate of €9,90 per quarter. However, a sample lesson is always free of charge, with no obligation to purchase, so why not try it out?!

Learn Polish
Learn Dutch
Learn Turkish
Learn Indosian