The Babbel Blog

language learning in the digital age

Babbel’s highlights from our team’s perspective!

Posted on January 20, 2014 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

With our Babbel birthday/ Christmas party last Friday, the weekend was slightly shorter for our 110 Babbel colleagues than usual. We had lots of fun celebrating Babbel’s six birthday and its numerous milestones achieved so far. In this video you can see what some colleagues of our team remember as a personal highlight of 2013 and they wish Babbel for the future!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Six Years!

Posted on January 15, 2014 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

by Markus Witte (Co-founder)

Hard to believe: the sixth year since we went online with Babbel is here. We are once again happy and proud to confirm that it was our most successful one yet. So much has happened in this last year: there was a financing round of over 10 million US Dollars, 45 great new people joined the Babbel team, including several experienced managers. In addition a new office, two new learning languages (Norwegian and Danish), new apps for two platforms (iOS and Android) – and a new logo! But above all millions of new users, for whom this is all happening.

What started with four founders in a small office in a cramped old apartment in Berlin-Kreuzberg, has grown into a buzzing hive of over 100 full-time employees. And there are also, believe it or not, more than 150 authors, pedagogues, editors, translators, narrators and supporters who work freelance while maintaining other professions such as teachers, musicians and actors. Added together that is a huge number of people, who are all creating Babbel together.

We feel that this is an excellent reason to celebrate. And since January is from the outset for us the liveliest month (through your and our many good intentions), we have even delayed Christmas somewhat. So, on Friday we will be rocking around the Christmas tree. And then it continues with the seventh year, for which we again have a lot planned. Some things shall be a surprise, and other things will go live before we discuss them. However the following are certain: there will be Russian, our first learning language that does not use the Latin alphabet. And we intend to whip the Review Manager into shape. And also learn a lot of new things ourselves. And continue to have lots of fun. And create.

 

BabbelTeam_InfoA3

BabbelUser_InfoA3

BabbelContent_InfoA3

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

The full spectrum of language learning: Babbel turns five!

Posted on January 15, 2013 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

It’s fascinating, all the things you can do with language learning. In this respect 2012 was a very creative and fruitful year for us, culminating in a nomination for Best German Start Up at the international The Europas Awards to be held in Berlin. Although the entire Babbel team is forward thinking as a matter of principle, staring the future fearlessly in the face, we want to take a moment now to glance back across an eventful year, in which you the Babbel user took a leading role.

Platform and system:

By far the biggest change can be seen in the fact that our editorial team have brought out more than 200 new courses in just 12 months with their unique passion and dedication. In total there are now 6,300 lessons available to you the Babbel user. When you think that on 15 January 2008 we came out with a single vocab trainer for 5 languages, you can see there has been some progress! This year saw the premiere of many new course formats, among others: Lifestyle courses, Dictation courses, Slang, and even a fun Dialect course for German (in which some of the Babbel employees star as guest speakers).

Which course was your favourite so far?

Our newest learning languages, Turkish and Dutch, have been reinforced with their own Beginner’s Courses – a popular request from our users – and a beginner’s course for Polish is in development.  We are expecting to be able to release two new learning languages in February: Danish and Norwegian.

Visually Babbel has also changed quite dramatically and the renovations are still underway! The community pages now subscribe to modern design standards and have benefited from a considerably better layout. Even the trainer will soon get a makeover. But fear not, we will stay true to the Babbel style – clean and simple, as you like it.

Mobile:

2012 was a whirlwind year for our mobile development team: In February our App for iPads came out, in March the App for Android, in June the iBook for iPad and the same for Kindle in August. Then in October the App for Windows 8  made its debut – and the grand finale of the year: the iPad App Version 3.0, containing the entire course programme, including the possibility to synchronise your learning progress between Web and App. In total during 2012 about 4.5 Million Babbel Apps were downloaded. It seems we are gradually catching up with your desire for good language courses on mobile platforms.

You (the Babbel users):

Worldwide you are 10 million users, who learn with Babbel on your computer and/or mobile device. This massive increase surely has something to do with the fact that Babbel is available on more and more devices with differing operating systems. More and more people can and want to learn languages with Babbel, unconstrained by time or place. This makes us very happy because, although we are on a steady upwards growth curve, we still have the same goal that we had five years ago when we started: To make understanding and learning a language on the internet easier.

The Babbelonians (the Babbel team):


We too are growing enormously, in the heart of Kreuzberg. Almost every week we have the pleasure to welcome a friendly new face to the team. Meanwhile (now in the middle of January) we are 60 full-time employees. Since our Bergmannstraße office is bursting at the seams, we will be taking over new, bigger premises in Bergmannstraße from the start of March. We’re staying faithful to our neighbourhood, because Kreuzberg brings us luck, as Markus, our commander in chief, puts it.

Our heartfelt thanks go out to each and every one of you and especially to those of you who have stuck with us through the years!

Keep learning and growing!

Happy Fifth Birthday Babbel!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Babbel: A comprehensive language learning system (video)

Posted on April 13, 2010 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

We are excited to announce that with some new features and software clients,  we have just made a leap towards becoming a language learning system unlike any other.

Babbel has never been just a website, but was rather built as a server client application. It’s no wonder, then, that we’d develop new platforms. Our objective has always been to make learning as simple, accessible and effective as possible using today’s state-of-the-art methods and technologies.

We’ve created Babbel Mobile, an iPhone app that can be used alone or as a complement to Babbel.com. You can now refresh your vocabulary anywhere and anytime, whether or not you’re on the internet. Then, with Babbel Refresh, the new desktop application for PC and Mac, you’ll always remember to review. Thirdly, a new list-view of your Personal Vocabulary also makes it simple to print out a vocabulary list, to remove words from the Refresher system or to get a full overview of your learning progress. And finally, we’re presenting a first Course in our new format: a new Italian Beginner’s Course is easier and clearer than ever.

Over the next days, we’ll cover all these new features in more detail. For now, just take a look at our new 30 second video above or here (in any or all of our seven languages).

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

The machines are taking over… YouTube incorporates subtitle translations

Posted on November 4, 2008 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

YouTube just recently added automatic subtitle translations, though like most everything out of the Google universe, it’s still in “beta”.  Subtitles and annotations were added as recently as the end of August to the videosharing service. The interpreter robot seems to work pretty well, at least in the example video where I tried Italian to English and Italian to German – I understood what the guy was saying (though it wasn’t all that encouraging – scary Italian politics). Anyway, you can use the translation service for any video that already has subtitles – just click on the arrow in the lower right hand corner.

The machine translation system for search results and websites of the do-no-harm Internet giant goes back to 2006, but it doesn’t rely only on computers (yet): A “Google Translation Center” is in the works, thought as a translation service for documents.: You can request a (human) translation or translate yourself and review a translation; though of course the professionals are going to get paid.

(via mashable)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Save an endangered word, redefine the dictionary

Posted on October 6, 2008 by

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone

I’ve always found it curious that the Americans have no centralized institution which establishes the end-all be-all of language. I mean, something along the lines of the German Rechtschreibungen, grammars that all of which incorporated a rather catastrophic spelling reform mandated by an official agreement between German-speaking countries in 1996. Or the Real Academia Española (the Royal Spanish Academy) which purports to maintain propriety, elegance, and purity in the Spanish language, and consistently has conferences all over Spain and Latin America deliberating which words are worthy of inclusion. The North American language, however, is a bit federated, you could say… if not Balkanized.

For the Brits, one of the closest things to language royalty – along with Oxford’s, of course – would be Collins’ Dictionary, which has recently gotten positively ruthless in cutting words it deems obsolete. The Times along with other linguistic luminaries have taken up the case to save “endangered” words from institutional oblivion, by using them in public, and so reviving them.

(more…)

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone